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Fact of the Day
Archive

We found: 145 results in all months of 2024

January 01, 2024
Picasso was not just a painter—he was also a sculptor, ceramicist, stage designer, poet, playwright, and print writer. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 02, 2024
The smallest monkey in the world is the pygmy marmoset, with a body as little as 5 inches (12 cm) and a tail length of about 7 inches (17 cm). As a comparison, they are about the size of a hamster, can fit in the palm of a human hand, and they weigh the same as a pack of cards. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 03, 2024
In 2019, a South Korean man was arrested for operating a fake lottery site. He and a group of 14 others had stolen over $41 million from over 340 individuals who had visited the site. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 04, 2024
Eating foods high in monounsaturated fats (such as avocados and nuts) is linked to higher general intelligence and better brain connectivity. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 05, 2024
The Islamic year is 11 days shorter than the year used in the Western world. This is because the Western year is based on the orbit of the Earth around the Sun instead of on the phases of the moon. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 06, 2024
A grasshopper's ears are found not on its head, but rather, on its belly. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 07, 2024
If people who normally had low fiber suddenly doubled their intake, they could lower their risk of colon cancer by 40%. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 08, 2024
Researchers speculate that humans laughed before they could speak. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 09, 2024
Finland consumes more caffeine than any other country, with the average adult consuming 400 mg each day. Following Finland are Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and France. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 10, 2024
Octopuses have the largest brain of any other invertebrate. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 11, 2024
A bristlecone pine tree nicknamed Methuselah is believed to be the oldest tree in the world. Its exact location is kept a secret to protect it from vandals and tourists. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 12, 2024
While the Santa Maria was the official flagship, Columbus frequently complained about its clumsiness and slowness. His favorite ship was the Nina, which was swifter and smaller. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 13, 2024
When allergic dermatitis caused by reaction to metals is severe enough, handling coins or touching a doorknob can be enough to cause blistering or scaling of the skin. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 14, 2024
The Danes have a term Janteloven (The Law of Jante), created in 1933 by a Danish/Norwegian writer. It is often quoted in public debate in Denmark and consists of “Ten Commandments,” all boiling down to “You are no better than I am.” Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 15, 2024
One in three gamers has experienced fraud while paying online games. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 16, 2024
An illegal firework that was designed to simulate the sound of gunfire is called the M-80, or the “military rifle fire simulator.” Also sometimes called “salutes,” M-80s have caused people to lose fingers and even hands. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 17, 2024
The current flag of Taiwan was adopted on December 17, 1928, after the unification of China. Its colors—blue, white, and red—represent nationalism, democracy, and social well-being; the Three People's Principles of Taiwan. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 18, 2024
Before the advent of Wi-Fi, the spectrum of radio frequencies used by Wi-Fi were referred to by some as “the garbage bands”—for being largely useless. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 19, 2024
Though it is the most difficult of the visible planets to see, Mercury's existence has been known since ancient Sumerian times, roughly 5,000 years ago. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 20, 2024
Refrigerators in the U.S. consume about the same energy as 25 large power plants produce each year. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 21, 2024
The longest known cave system on earth is in Kentucky at the Mammoth Cave National Park. It stretches for more than 390 miles, and that’s just what has been explored. Scientists believe it may be over 600 miles long. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 22, 2024
The northern hawk owl is able to hear prey as much as 12 inches under the snow. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 23, 2024
Saturn is not the only planet with rings. Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune also have rings, although they are much fainter and less spectacular than Saturn’s. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 24, 2024
The world’s oldest bottle of wine dates back to A.D. 325 and was found near the town of Speyer, Germany, inside one of two Roman sarcophaguses. It is on display at the town’s Historisches Museum der Pfalz. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 25, 2024
The American Professional Football Association was formed in 1920; two years later it changed its name to the National Football League (NFL), which would ultimately become the major league of American football. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 26, 2024
The letter π is the first letter of the Greek word “periphery” and “perimeter.” The symbol π in mathematics represents the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. In other words, π is the number of times a circle’s diameter will fit around its circumference. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 27, 2024
Sharks kill about 12 people a year. People kill about 11,417 sharks—an hour. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 28, 2024
Berlin’s Zoologischer Garten is the largest zoo in the world both in terms of number of species (1,500) and animal population (14,000). Germany boasts more than 400 registered zoos. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 29, 2024
A new person is added to the United States national transplant waiting list every 10 minutes—that's 144 people per day. Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 30, 2024
A group of lizards is called a "lounge." Provided by FactRetriever.com
January 31, 2024
Given that the world is about 25,000 miles in circumference and that the average walking rate is 3 miles per hour, it would take a person walking nonstop approximately 347 days to walk around the world. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 01, 2024
The worst volcanic disaster of the twentieth century is considered to be the eruption of Mt. Pelée in 1902 on the island of Martinique in the Caribbean which killed 30,121 people. Only two people survived: a shoemaker living on the edge of the island and a prisoner who had been locked in a dungeon cell with thick stone walls. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 02, 2024
Dubbed the "Marathon Man," Belgian runner Stefaan Engels ran the marathon distance every day for a year, totaling 9,569 miles (1,5401 km). Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 03, 2024
Soviet spy Colonel Oleg Penkovsky provided valuable information about the status of the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons to both the CIA and British intelligence. The KGB arrested him on October 22, 1962, in Moscow and most likely executed him shortly after. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 04, 2024
Taiwan boasts the largest collection of Chinese art in the world. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 05, 2024
Horses cannot breathe through their mouth, only through their nose. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 06, 2024
Approximately 63% of youth suicides in the U.S. are kids who live in a home without a father. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 07, 2024
After Joachim Neumann, a civil engineering student, escaped East Berlin by pretending to be a Swiss tourist, he spent the next five months digging a tunnel from West to East Berlin. He ultimately helped his girlfriend and 57 other people escape. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 08, 2024
Iceland uses 100% renewable electricity, making it the “greenest” country in the world. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 09, 2024
Laura Scudder created the first modern bag of potato chips in 1953. Previously, they were sold out of wooden barrels or scooped from behind glass counters. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 10, 2024
The Industrial Revolution allowed people to work longer and year-round. Labor was no longer tied to the season or natural lighting. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 11, 2024
Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, a Persian poet and Sufi master born in 1207, is the best-selling poet in the United States. A compelling figure in poetry, Rumi's poems articulate what it feels like to be alive. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 12, 2024
Although hummus doesn't have as much healthy monounsaturated fat as guacamole, it does have approximately 2.4 grams more protein. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 13, 2024
Unlike many mammals, bears can see in color. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 14, 2024
Déjà vu (French for “already seen”) has never been fully explained, though some scientists believe that a neurological glitch causes an experience to be registered in the memory before reaching consciousness. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 15, 2024
While the Grand Canyon as a whole is considered to be a semi-arid desert, it is so large that it contains five habitats: boreal forest, ponderosa forest, pinyon-juniper woodland, desert scrub, and riparian. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 16, 2024
Colonial Americans either gave credit to each other or relied on credit from banks in England, so there were no banks in the United States until after the Revolutionary War. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 17, 2024
In 1894, Russian scientist Marie Mikhaïlovna de Manacééne conducted one of the earliest experiments on extreme sleep deprivation. She found that when she deprived puppies of sleep, they all died within four or five days, despite every effort to keep them alive. The younger the puppy, the more quickly it died. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 18, 2024
If someone reports their company for tax evasion in the U.S., he or she will receive 30% of the amount collected. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 19, 2024
Although hummus doesn't have as much healthy monounsaturated fat as guacamole, it does have approximately 2.4 grams more protein. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 20, 2024
Unlike many mammals, bears can see in color. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 21, 2024
Déjà vu (French for “already seen”) has never been fully explained, though some scientists believe that a neurological glitch causes an experience to be registered in the memory before reaching consciousness. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 22, 2024
While the Grand Canyon as a whole is considered to be a semi-arid desert, it is so large that it contains five habitats: boreal forest, ponderosa forest, pinyon-juniper woodland, desert scrub, and riparian. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 23, 2024
Colonial Americans either gave credit to each other or relied on credit from banks in England, so there were no banks in the United States until after the Revolutionary War. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 24, 2024
The Barbie doll’s full name is Barbara Millicent Roberts, and she is from Willows, Wisconsin. Her birthday is March 9, 1959, when Mattell first displayed her at the New York Toy Fair. [source]
February 25, 2024
Sunshine originates from a nuclear fusion in the core of the Sun, where hydrogen fuses into helium and mass converts into heat energy. This same nuclear reaction has continued for the past 4.6 billion years. [source]
February 26, 2024
The idiom "kiss and make up" first surfaced in 1826 and gained initial popularity in 1859. Since then... [read more on Refdesk].
February 27, 2024
Epinephrine injections are used to treat severe bee sting allergies. Epinephrine is another name for Adrenaline; the active pharmaceutical ingredient in the Epipen or Anapen devices. [source]
February 28, 2024
In Albania, a group of women called Burneshas live in mountain villages as men to avoid societal restrictions. They cut their hair, wear men’s clothing, practice male gestures and mannerisms, change their names, and swear celibacy. Provided by FactRetriever.com
February 29, 2024
The world's second-largest colony of emperor penguins has nearly disappeared after changes in sea/ice conditions made their breeding ground unstable. The species might lose anywhere between 50% and 70% of its global population by the end of this century. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 01, 2024
Researchers have recently found that those who suffer from depression are at risk for low bone mineral density. Depressed women are especially at risk for developing osteoporosis. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 02, 2024
Sperm whales can dive as deep as two miles into the water, and their bodies have unique physiological adaptations to allow them to survive the intense cold and crushing pressure of these dives. They can limit circulation to the brain and other organs, slow the heart to 10 beats per minute to conserve oxygen, and collapse the lungs and rib cage to withstand pressure. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 03, 2024
The most luminous and massive known star is R136a1 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. It's 8.7 million times brighter than our Sun. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 04, 2024
William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) holds the record for the longest inauguration speech in history at 8,578 words long and one hour and 40 minutes. Unfortunately, he gave the speech during bad weather, and a month later, he was dead from pneumonia, making his presidency the shortest on record. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 05, 2024
The Philadelphia Mint can make 1.8 million coins an hour, 32 million coins per day, and 13.5 billion coins every year. The Philadelphia facility is the largest mint in the world. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 05, 2024
The Philadelphia Mint can make 1.8 million coins an hour, 32 million coins per day, and 13.5 billion coins every year. The Philadelphia facility is the largest mint in the world. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 06, 2024
In one of his sporadic attempts at public relations, Chicago gangster Al Capone (1899-1947) opened a soup kitchen during the Great Depression. For millions, soup kitchens provided the only food they would see all day. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 07, 2024
Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687) is regarded as the father of French opera, though he was born in Italy. He pioneered the conducting stick concept, but unfortunately, he hit his foot with a heavy conducting staff. His foot became gangrenous, ultimately killing him. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 08, 2024
Some Viking longships had carvings of dragon heads on their prows (fronts). The Vikings called these ships "Drakkar" or "dragon ships." Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 09, 2024
Qatar features the widest gender imbalance in the world, where men outnumber women by a 3:1 ratio. Qatar’s residents are predominantly immigrants who are young and male. Provided by BBC
March 10, 2024
London-based bank HSBC has laundered billions of dollars for Mexican drug cartels. It became such a common occurrence that one cartel even designed special cash boxes to fit more easily through HSBC teller windows. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 11, 2024
On the first day of spring, a person at the North Pole would see the sun skimming across the horizon, beginning six months of uninterrupted daylight. A person at the South Pole would see the sun skimming across the horizon, signaling the start of six months of darkness. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 12, 2024
The medical name for caffeine is 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 13, 2024
Covering only 27 acres (11 ha), Bukit Nanas, in the heart of Kuala Lumpur, is among the smallest patches of rainforest in the world. It is Malaysia’s oldest nature reserve. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 14, 2024
Antarctica is the 5th largest continent and is roughly the size of Australia. However, it doesn't have a capital city or an official language, and no country controls it. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 15, 2024
The heart of a giraffe weighs 25 pounds (11.3 kilograms) and is about 2 feet long (0.6 meters). Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 16, 2024
Half of the names of U.S. states are derived from Amerindian words, such as Arizona, Connecticut, Kentucky, and Missouri. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 17, 2024
During the War of 1812, the British captured the United States capitol, Washington, DC. However, their occupation lasted just 26 hours due to a tornado that formed in the city and headed straight for the British on Capitol Hill. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 18, 2024
Barn owls eat over 1,000 mice per year. The owls swallow their prey whole—skin, bones, and all. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 19, 2024
Mosaicism is the least common form of Down syndrome, accounting for only 1% of cases. Mosaicism is caused when cells with the normal amount of chromosomes and cells with an added chromosome mix and replicate a chromosome 21 in the latter. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 20, 2024
The longest walk around the world was completed by a former neon-sign salesman, Jean Beliveau. He walked 46,600 miles around 64 countries. The trip took him 11 years. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 21, 2024
Mosaicism is the least common form of Down syndrome, accounting for only 1% of cases. Mosaicism is caused when cells with the normal amount of chromosomes and cells with an added chromosome mix and replicate a chromosome 21 in the latter. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 22, 2024
In the North, more than 1/3 of all men of military age served in the war. For the South, it was nearly 2/3. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 23, 2024
The meanings of words in Romance and Germanic languages do not vary based on tone and pitch. Words in tonal languages, such as Mandarin and Hmong, do. In these "tonal languages," the same sound can have up to eight meanings, depending on the way it is said. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 24, 2024
According to Cherokee legend, the Milky Way was formed when a dog stole some cornmeal and was chased away. He ran to the north, spilling cornmeal as he ran. The Milky Way is thus called “The Way the Dog Ran Away.” Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 25, 2024
Called “re-entrants,” dolphins once lived on land and looked and behaved something like a small wolf but with five hoof-like toes on each foot instead of claws. Dolphins also have remnant finger bones in their flippers, a forearm, wrists, and a few remnant leg bones deep inside their bodies. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 26, 2024
The Civil War was the bloodiest war ever fought on American soil. During an average day during the war, approximately 600 people were killed. By the end of the war, over 618,000 people had died. This is more Americans than WWI, WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War combined. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 27, 2024
Though U.S. pharmacist John S. Pemberton invented Coca-Cola in 1886, his bookkeeper, Frank Robinson invented the name. Robinson had beautiful handwriting, and his flowering script is still used today. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 28, 2024
In 1986, Norwegian Monica Kristensen received the prestigious Gold Medal of the Royal Geographical Society in London, becoming the first woman in 50 years to receive this award, for leading a successful expedition to the South Pole. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 29, 2024
Monet's mentor, Eugene Boudin, was one of the first artists to adopt "Plein air" (in full air) painting, to watch and capture the light on natural forms. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 30, 2024
According to legend, tea was discovered in 2737 B.C. by Chinese Emperor Shen-Nung, known as the “Divine Healer.” Purportedly, he discovered the beverage when tea leaves accidentally blew into his pot of boiling water. Provided by FactRetriever.com
March 31, 2024
With a tax rate of 51.4% of GDP, Swedes are one of the most highly taxed populations in the world. Ironically, they are generally happy to pay a high tax rate, and the Swedish word for tax is skatt, or “treasure.” Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 01, 2024
The post-WWII hyperinflation of Hungary holds the record for the most rapid monthly inflation increase ever: 41,900,000,000,000,000% for July 1946, which means prices doubled every 13.5 hours. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 02, 2024
The only bird with nostrils at the end of its beak is the kiwi. This placement helps it sniff for food, such as worms and insects on the ground. It often snorts to clear its nostrils. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 03, 2024
Harmless to humans, Thermophylic viruses have been found in Congress Pool at Yellowstone’s Norris Geyser Basin. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 04, 2024
It takes about 220 gallons of water to grow one large avocado. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 05, 2024
Norwegian Erik Rotheim invented the forerunner of the can-and-aerosol system we known as the aerosol spray can. He was granted a patent for his invention in Norway on October 8, 1926. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 06, 2024
With over two dozen regularly erupting volcanos, Iceland is one of the most volcanically active spots on Earth. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 07, 2024
Los Angeles International Airport emits approximately 19,000 tons of carbon dioxide—a month. The roughly 33,000 planes that fly in and out of the airport each month release about 800,000 tons of carbon dioxide. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 08, 2024
Nearly 90% of London’s police officers don’t carry firearms. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 09, 2024
Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president an astonishing four terms before the 22nd Amendment set term limits. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 10, 2024
Because dragonfly eyes have about 30,000 lenses, they can see nearly 360 degrees. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 11, 2024
Linguists have identified words in the modern Estonian language that were also used by ancient inhabitants of Estonia over 5,000 years ago. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 12, 2024
Lake Taupo was the source of the world’s largest known volcanic eruption in the last 70,000 years. It is estimated that its violent birth spewed 15,000 times the volume of material ejected when Mount Saint Helens in Washington State erupted in 1980. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 13, 2024
The feathers under a flamingo's wings are black. You typically see them when they are flying. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 14, 2024
While not as common as with dogs, ferrets will wag their tail when happy. They will also make a chortling or clucking sound known as “dooking.” Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 15, 2024
The male platypus has spurs above its hind legs that it can use to pierce and insert venom into its enemies. Humans who have been pierced report that the venom caused their hands and arms to swell up and lock-jaw to set in, accompanied by severe pain that lasts for weeks. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 16, 2024
The largest hurricane can be the size of the state of Montana, 600 miles (966 kilometers) wide. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 17, 2024
Knitting is considered to have originated in the Arab world, and from there, spread with the Crusades into Spain. The term “to knit” wasn’t added to English until the 1400s. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 18, 2024
When the body walks faster than speeds of 3.1 mph, a person’s stride length naturally increases, which burns more calories. Research shows that at maximal levels of exertion, oxygen consumption is only slightly lower for race walkers than it is for runners. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 19, 2024
Cattle (which include sheep, camels, and other livestock) are the first and oldest form of money. Each head of cattle was called a caput, which is Latin for “head.” So, a person with a lot of cattle had lots of caput or “capital,” a word still used today to describe money. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 20, 2024
The platypus differs from all other mammals in another way: it can send out electrical impulses to locate prey in deep waters. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 21, 2024
The only place in the world where skunks are found other than America is Indonesia and the Philippines, where they are called stink badgers. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 22, 2024
A new person is added to the United States national transplant waiting list every 10 minutes—that's 144 people per day. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 23, 2024
Vatican City is the only nation in the world that can lock its own gates at night. It has its own phone company, radio, T.V. stations, money, and stamps. It even has its army, the historic Swiss Guard. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 24, 2024
The Titanic's chief baker nonchalantly stepped off the stern of the sinking liner and calmly paddled around until dawn. After he was rescued, he was back at work within days. Experts note that he survived history's greatest maritime disaster by getting completely drunk. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 25, 2024
Monarch butterflies can fly as high as 10,000 feet. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 26, 2024
Over just 50 square miles, Jerusalem has over 2,000 archeological sites. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 27, 2024
The pacemaker, ultrasound, safety match, astronomical lens, marine propeller, the refrigerator, and computer mouse are all famous items that were invented in Sweden or by Swedes who weren’t living in Sweden. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 28, 2024
Hawksbill sea turtles live in coral reefs and feed on sponges. Without the hawksbill, sponges would overgrow and suffocate the delicate and slow-growing corals. Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 29, 2024
Scientists believe that the white spots behind the ears of a tiger help tiger cubs follow their mothers through the shady forest. The white spot is called an "ocelli." Provided by FactRetriever.com
April 30, 2024
The famous tree from which the legendary Newton apple fell is still growing at Woolsthorpe Manor today. It is over 350 years old. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 01, 2024
A 100 lb. person on Earth would weigh just under 3 pounds on Charon. A 100 lb. person on Charon would weigh just over 3, 503 pounds on Earth. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 02, 2024
De architectura libri decem, or The Ten Books on Architecture, written by the Roman Vitruvius, is the oldest surviving garden design manual, dating from 27 B.C. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 03, 2024
The fastest fish is the sailfish. It can swim as fast as a car travels on the highway. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 04, 2024
Mars 2, built by the former Soviet Union, has the bittersweet distinction of being the first human-built object to touch down on Mars in November 1971. Unfortunately, it crashed into the surface during a massive dust storm. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 05, 2024
Actor Jimmy Stewart was rejected by the military after he was drafted—he was too thin. As a show of patriotism, Stewart went on a weight-gaining diet, hoping to reverse the decision. He was accepted by the Air Force after making weight and served in WWII with distinction. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 06, 2024
The gas cloud surrounding the stars in the constellation Aquila contains enough alcohol to make 400 trillion pints of beer. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 07, 2024
In 1768, French explorer Louis-Antoine de Bougainville named the islands of Samoa the "Navigator Islands," as he found the people to have great navigational skills for sailing and trading with nearby islands. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 08, 2024
Parts of the Great Wall of China were surrounded by defensive moats, which were either filled with water or left as ditches. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 09, 2024
India is the birthplace of chess. The original word for “chess” is the Sanskrit chaturanga, meaning “four members of an army”—which were mostly likely elephants, horses, chariots, and foot soldiers. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 10, 2024
While the buttercup looks innocent, it is among the more deadly garden plants. If eaten, this innocent-looking flower can cause painful death resulting from organ and nervous system intoxication. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 11, 2024
The only venomous lizard in the United States, the Gila monster, lives in Arizona. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 12, 2024
The Sedlec Ossuary (“Church of Bones”) is a small Roman Catholic Chapel in the Czech Republic. It uses 40,000–70,000 human skeletons as decorations. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 13, 2024
Giraffe necks can be up to six feet long (1.8 meters) and can weigh up to 600 pounds (272 kilograms). Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 14, 2024
Silver was once mined in a German town called "Joachim's Valley." Coins minted from this mine were called "joachmisthaler," which was shortened into "thaler," which later morphed into the word "dollar." Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 15, 2024
Beet juice can indicate the acidity of a solution. If a solution turns pink when beet juice is added, it is an acid. If it turns yellow, the solution is alkaline. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 16, 2024
Mars 2, built by the former Soviet Union, has the bittersweet distinction of being the first human-built object to touch down on Mars in November 1971. Unfortunately, it crashed into the surface during a massive dust storm. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 17, 2024
Evidence in Peru suggests that popcorn existed as early as 4700 B.C., making it one of the oldest forms of corn. Peruvians didn’t just pop their corn; they also ground it into flour to cook in other ways. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 18, 2024
In 1768, French explorer Louis-Antoine de Bougainville named the islands of Samoa the "Navigator Islands," as he found the people to have great navigational skills for sailing and trading with nearby islands. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 19, 2024
Parts of the Great Wall of China were surrounded by defensive moats, which were either filled with water or left as ditches. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 20, 2024
India is the birthplace of chess. The original word for “chess” is the Sanskrit chaturanga, meaning “four members of an army”—which were mostly likely elephants, horses, chariots, and foot soldiers. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 21, 2024
While the buttercup looks innocent, it is among the more deadly garden plants. If eaten, this innocent-looking flower can cause painful death resulting from organ and nervous system intoxication. Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 22, 2024
Silver was once mined in a German town called "Joachim's Valley." Coins minted from this mine were called "joachmisthaler," which was shortened into "thaler," which later morphed into the word "dollar." Provided by FactRetriever.com
May 23, 2024
The only venomous lizard in the United States, the Gila monster, lives in Arizona. Provided by FactRetriever.com





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